Criticism/Theory First Edition Paperback 232 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 19 ORDER

Franco "Bifo" Berardi, The Soul at Work: from Alienation to Autonomy, Semiotext(e), 2009

In this, his newest book, Franco "Bifo" Berardi—key member of the Italian Autonomist movement and a close associate of Félix Guattari—addresses these new forms of estrangement. In the philosophical landscape of the 1960s and 1970s, the Hegelian concept of alienation was used to define the harnessing of subjectivity. The estrangement of workers from their labor, the feeling of alienation they experienced, and their refusal to submit to it became the bases for a human community that remained autonomous from capital. But today a new condition of alienation has taken root in which workers commonly and voluntarily work overtime, the population is tethered to cell phones and Blackberries, debt has become a postmodern form of slavery, and antidepressants are commonly used to meet the unending pressure of production. As a result, the conditions for community have run aground and new philosophical categories are needed. The Soul at Work is a clarion call for a new collective effort to reclaim happiness.

Anthology, Criticism/Theory New edition Softcover 300 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 20 ORDER

Boyd McDonald, Cruising the Movies. A Sexual Guide to Oldies on TV, Semiotext(e), 2015

Cruising the Movies was Boyd McDonald’s “sexual guide” to televised cinema, originally published by the Gay Presses of New York in 1985. The capstone of McDonald’s prolific turn as a freelance film columnist for the magazine Christopher Street, Cruising the Movies collects the author’s movie reviews of 1983–1985. This new, expanded edition also includes previously uncollected articles and a new introduction by William E. Jones.

Better known as the editor of the Straight to Hell paperback series—a compendia of real-life sexual stories that is part pornography, part ethnography—McDonald in his film writing reveals both his studious and sardonic sides. Many of the texts in Cruising the Movies were inspired by McDonald’s attentive inspection of the now-shuttered MoMA Film Stills Archive, and his columns gloriously capture a bygone era in film fandom. Gay and subcultural, yet never reducible to a zany cult concern or mere camp, McDonald’s “reviews” capture a lost art of queer cinephilia, recording a furtive obsession that once animated gay urban life. With lancing wit, Cruising celebrates gay subculture’s profound embrace of mass culture, seeing film for what it is—a screen that reflects our fantasies, desires, and dreams.

Anthology, Fiction Second Edition Soft cover, perfect binding 300 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 32 ORDER

François Peraldi, Polysexuality (Semiotext(e) #10), Semiotext(e), 1995

Originally conceived as a special Semiotext(e) issue on homosexuality at the end of the 70s, “Polysexuality” quickly evolved into a more complex and iconoclastic project whose intent was to do away with recognized genders altogether, considered far too limitative. The project landed somewhere between humor, anarchy, science-fiction, utopia and apocalypse. In the few years that it took to put it together, it also evolved from a joyous schizo concept to a darker, neo-Lacanian elaboration on the impossibility of sexuality. The tension between the two, occasionally perceptible, is the theoretical subtext of the issue. Upping the ante on gender distinctions, “Polysexuality” started by blowing wide open all sexual classifications, inventing unheard-of categories, regrouping singular features into often original configurations, like Corporate Sex, Alimentary Sex, Soft or Violent Sex, Discursive Sex, Self- Sex, Animal Sex, Child Sex, Morbid Sex, or Sex of the Gaze. Mixing documents, interviews, fiction, theory, poetry, psychiatry and anthropology, “Polysexuality” became the encyclopedia sexualis of a continent that is still emerging. What it displayed in all its forms could be called, broadly speaking, the Sexuality of Capital. (Actually the issue being rather hot, it was decided to cool it off somewhat by only using “capitals” throughout the issue. It was also the first issue for which we used the computer).
 
Includes work by Alain Robbe-Grillet, Félix Guattari, Paul Verlaine, William S.Burroughs, Georges Bataille, Pierre Klossowski, Roland Barthes, Paul Virilio, Peter Lamborn Wilson, and more.


 

Fiction First Edition Softcover 256 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 21 ORDER

Chris Kraus, Summer of Hate, Semiotext(e), 2012

Waking up from the chilling high of a near-death sex game, Catt Dunlop travels to Albuquerque in 2005 to reinvest some windfall real-estate gains and reengage with something approximating “real life.” Aware that the critical discourse she has used to build her career as a visiting professor and art critic is really a cipher for something else, she hopes that buying and fixing slum buildings will bring her more closely in touch with American life than the essays she writes.

In Albuquerque, she becomes romantically involved with Paul Garcia, a recently sober ex-con who has just served sixteen months in state prison for defrauding Halliburton Industries, his former employer, of $873. Almost forty years old, Paul is highly intelligent but has only been out of New Mexico twice. He has no information. With Catt’s help, he makes plans to attend UCLA, only to be arrested on a ten-year-old bench warrant en route.

Fiction First Edition Softcover 248 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 21 ORDER

Mark Von Schlegell, Venusia, Semiotext(e), 2005

Primitive literacy is redundant. Mere words are expelled. We inaugurate a world of pure presence. The mind, that intrudes itself between ourselves and those memories too terrible to know, must keep us moving beyond the grasp of their claw. To control the flow, it will be necessary that political order be imposed always temporarily. The state shall enjoy direct, creative access to the real.It's the end of the twenty-third century. Earth has violently self-destructed. Venusia, an experimental off-world colony, survives under the enlightened totalitarianism of the Princeps Crittendon regime. Using industrialized narcotics, holographic entertainment, and memory control, Crittendon has turned Venusia into a self-sustaining system of relative historical inertia. But when mild-mannered junk dealer Rogers Collectibles finds a book about early Venusian history, the colony -- once fully immersed in the present -- begins losing its grip on the real. With his Reality-V girlfriend Martha Dobbs, neuroscop operator Sylvia Yang, his midget friend Niftus Norrington, and a sentient plant, Rogers wages a war to alter the shape of spacetime, and in the process, revisions the whole human (and vegetable) condition.

Criticism/Theory First Edition Softcover Texts in English   New       EUR 15 out of stock

Bruce Hainley, Art & Culture, Semiotext(e), 2014

AIDS everywhere. Facebook it.

Criticism/Theory First Edition Staple-bound Texts in English   New       EUR 15 ORDER

Sylvère Lotringer, The Miserables, Semiotext(e), 2014

What societies of control are achieving in the West through invasive technologies and the soft violence of financial capitalism—the production of work slaves and human zombies—is being enforced in the rest of the world by the most brutal, extreme, inhuman means. Narco-Capitalism, the extreme violence now raging in Mexico, is only the latest in an enterprise of systematic dehumanization that is affecting the entire planet.

Criticism/Theory First Edition Softcover 304 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 39 ORDER

Bruce Hainley, Under the Sign of [sic]: Sturtevant's Volte-Face, Semiotext(e), 2014

Asked to sum up her artistic pursuit, the American artist Elaine Sturtevant once replied: “I create vertigo.” Since the mid-1960s, Sturtevant has been using repetition to change the way art is understood. In 1965, what seemed to be a group show by then “hot” artists (Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, George Segal, and James Rosenquist, among others) was in fact Sturtevant’s first solo exhibit, every work in it created by herself.

In Under the Sign of [sic], Bruce Hainley unpacks the work of Sturtevant, providing the first book-length monographic study of the artist in English. Hainley draws on elusive archival materials to tackle not only Sturtevant’s work but also the essential problem that it poses. Hainley examines all of Sturtevant’s projects in a single year (1967); uses her Gonzalez-Torres Untitled (Go-Go Dancing Platform) from 1995 as a conceptual wedge to consider contemporary art’s place in the world; and, finally, digs into the most occluded part of her career, from 1971 to 1973, when she created works by Michael Heizer and Walter de Maria, and had her first solo American museum exhibit.

Criticism/Theory, Fiction Paperback 148 pages 17 x 11 cm Texts in English   New       EUR 15 ORDER

Kathy Acker, Hannibal Lecter, My Father, Semiotext(e), 1991

Edited by Acker for Semiotext(e) in 1991, this volume contains Acker's never-before published early writings, documentation of her obscenity trial, and the definitive interview about her life and work by Sylvère Lotringer.

“Acker: (...) The idea that you don't need to have a central identity, that a split identity [is] more a viable way in the world. I was splitting the I into false and true I's and I just wanted to see this false I was more or less real than the true I; what are the reality levels between false and true and how it worked. And of course there's no difference. By the end of TARANTULA, when I do the de Sade business, I can't tell what's true or false, except for actual dates. If I say I was born in 1748, I know that's false...“ (extract of Devoured by Myths, and interview with Sylvère Lotringer).

Periodical Soft cover, perfect binding Texts in English   New       EUR 15 ORDER

Animal Shelter #4, Semiotext(e), 2015

This fourth issue is coedited by Hedi El Kholti and Robert Dewhurst and circles a constellation of sex, exchange, and debt, with a substantial portion devoted to poetry. 
 
ALAIN BADIOU on Pierre Guyotat’s cosmology
TONY DUVERT on ugliness and de Sade
THOMAS GOKEY on art after Occupy
Trance verses by WAYNE KOESTENBAUM
KEVIN KILLIAN on pop-vocalist Maxime Le Forrestier
A conversation with MAURIZIO LAZZARATO on debt and time
SARAH LEHRER-GRAIWER on Lee Lozano’s notebooks
Poetry by ALICE NOTLEY, DOROTHEA LASKY, DANA WARD
 
Other contributors include: Jackie Wang, Emmanuel Moreira, Marie Buck, Lisa Cohen, Robert Glück, Ann Rower, Kate Zambreno, Gary Indiana, Matias Viegener, Rob Halpern, Candice Lin, CAConrad, Bradford Nordeen, Andrew Bernardini, Tim Dean, Jamie Stewart, William Dunaway, Jr.
Art by: Kath Bloom, Kath Bloom, Paul Chan, Steve Dalachinsky, Hedi El Kholti, Aimee Goguen, Vanessa Haney, Gary Indiana, Patrick Kwon, Eli Langer, Candice Lin, Lee Lozano, Filip Noterdaeme, Brad Troemel, and Cayal Unger.

Fiction First Edition Paperback 256 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 20 out of stock

Erje Ayden, Sadness at Leaving: An Espionage Romance, Semiotext(e), 1987

I wonder if it is lustful
A tank in its dreams
What do airplanes think
When left alone?
We did not seek happiness
We invented sadness
Were we not of this world?
Orhan Veli, epigram to Sadness at Leaving
 
During the 1960s and 70s, Turkish-born Erje Ayden served as house pulp fiction writer to the New York School of painters and poets. Friend and sometime bodyguard to the artist Willem De Kooning, Ayden self-published 7 pop novels, written in rapid amphetamine bursts in borrowed apartments and rooming houses. Sadness at Leaving, re-published by Semiotext(e) in 1998, is Ayden's most autobiographical work—if one accepts, as he claims, that he worked as a spy for the Turkish government throughout those years.
East Berlin, 1959: Following the erection of the Berlin wall, special agent Carl Halman is assigned by East German intelligence to move to New York where he'll "sleep" as a writer until he is called. Using the code-name "April 23," Carl successfully infiltrates the uptown-downtown literary world in 1950s New York. He edits a magazine, follows the Knicks, and marries Melinda, the socialite wife of best-selling jock novelist Hubert Cleaver, Ayden's hilarious Norman Mailer pastiche. Through Carl's eyes, we see New York City change from an outpost of Europe to the new capital of an anarchistic, post-ideological world. But then, when Carl least expects it, he's called.

Criticism/Theory, Poetry First Edition Paperback 160 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 18 ORDER

Kathy Acker, McKenzie Wark, I'm Very Into You, Semiotext(e), 2015

I'm Very Into You, Correspondence 1995–1996 between Kathy Acker and McKenzie Wark

“Why am I telling you all this? Partly ‘cause the whole queerness/identity thing for me stretches through everything, absolutely everything. Slipping between straight/gay is child’s play compared to slipping between writer/teacher/influence-peddler whatever. I forget who I am. You reminded me of who I prefer to be.” [M.W.]

“It’s two in the morning. . . I know what you mean about slipping roles: I love it, going high low, power helpless even captive, male female, all over the place, space totally together and brain-sharp, if it wasn’t for play I’d be bored stiff and I think boredom is the emotion I find most unbearable. . . ” [KA]

After Kathy Acker met McKenzie Wark on a trip to Australia in 1995, they had a brief fling and immediately began a heated two-week email correspondence. Their emails shimmer with insight, gossip, sex, and cultural commentary. They write in a frenzy, several times a day; their emails cross somewhere over the International Date Line, and themselves become a site of analysis. What results is an index of how two brilliant and idiosyncratic writers might go about a courtship across 7,500 miles of airspace—by pulling in Alfred Hitchcock, stuffed animals, Georges Bataille, Elvis Presley, phenomenology, Marxism, The X-files, psychoanalysis, and the I Ching.

Fiction First Edition Softcover 248 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 21 ORDER

Mark Von Schlegell, Sundogz, Semiotext(e), 2015

“Was there some sort of accident? The Doll was now certain that the Japanese didn’t consider him a human. He was concerned with Deary alone. Her flukes lifted to maintain her treading water, left her pale bottom and sex exposed. Was he watching simultaneously from below? The Doll let his tendrils obscure. 5 hours till orbital synch, he remembered. The Doll called up the red-screen into his mindspace and traced the instantly visible tags: Mab's Buoy relay SFS Good Fortune, Wawagawanet 2145270401:33“

Sundogz is set among the water-rich moons of planet Uranus, where extremist astro-marine “spacers” have constructed an aquatic world of extraordinary scope and ambition, entirely invisible to the System at large. The Good Fortune, a spaceship en route to Moon Miranda, the most beautiful and troublesome of Uranus’s satellites, sends out a party to explore rumors of a secret fish farm in the λ ring. Now the "Oan Bubble" must attempt to survive its discovery. The characters in Sundogz traverse a cybernetic world containing traces of nineteenth-century realism, Shakespearean-style wit and violence, and classic fantasy, while exploring possible modes of the imagination’s survival in centuries to come.

Fiction First Edition Softcover 288 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 21 ORDER

Mark Von Schlegell, Mercury Station, Semiotext(e), 2009

It is 2150. Eddard J. Ryan was born in a laboratory off Luna City, an orphan raised by the Black Rose Army, a radical post-Earth Irish revolutionary movement. But his first bombing went wrong and he’s been stuck in a borstal on Mercury for decades. System Space has collapsed and most of human civilization with it, but Eddie Ryan and his fellow prisoners continue to suffer the remote-control domination of the borstal and its condescending central authority, the qompURE MERKUR, programmed to treat them as adolescents. Yet things could be worse. With little human supervision, the qompURE can be fooled. There’s food and whiskey, and best of all, the girl of Eddie Ryan’s dreams, his long-time friend and comrade Koré McAllister, is in the same prison. When his old boss, rich and eccentric chrononaut Count Reginald Skaw shows up in orbit with an entire interstation cruiser at his disposal, there’s even the possibility of escape... back in time.

Criticism/Theory, Source Book 240 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 42 ORDER

Sylvère Lotringer, David Morris, Schizo-Culture, 2 vol. set (The Event, The Book), Semiotext(e), 2014

The legendary 1975 “Schizo-Culture” conference, conceived by the early Semiotext(e) collective, began as an attempt to introduce the then-unknown radical philosophies of post-’68 France to the American avant-garde. The event featured a series of seminal papers, from Deleuze’s first presentation of the concept of the “rhizome” to Foucault’s introduction of his History of Sexuality project. The conference was equally important on a political level, and brought together a diverse group of activists, thinkers, patients, and ex-cons in order to address the challenge of penal and psychiatric institutions. The combination proved to be explosive, but amid the fighting and confusion “Schizo-Culture” revealed deep ruptures in left politics, French thought, and American culture.

The “Schizo-Culture” issue of the Semiotext(e) journal came three years later. Designed by a group of artists and filmmakers including Kathryn Bigelow and Denise Green, it documented the chaotic creativity of an emerging downtown New York scene, and offered interviews with artists, theorists, writers, and No Wave and pre-punk musicians together with new texts from Deleuze, Foucault, R. D. Laing, and other conference participants.

This slip-cased edition includes The Book: 1978, a facsimile reproduction of the original Schizo-Culture publication; and The Event: 1975, a previously unpublished and comprehensive record of the conference that set it all off. It assembles many previously unpublished texts, including a detailed selection of interviews reconstructing the events, and features Félix Guattari, William Burroughs, Kathy Acker, Michel Foucault, Sylvère Lotringer, Guy Hocquenghem, Gilles Deleuze, John Rajchman, Robert Wilson, Joel Kovel, Jack Smith, Jean-François Lyotard, Ti-Grace Atkinson, François Peraldi, and John Cage.

Criticism/Theory First Edition Paperback Texts in English   New       EUR 15 ORDER

Simone Weill, Note on the Abolition of All Political Parties, Semiotext(e), 2014

Almost everywhere - and often for purely technical problems - the operation of taking sides, of taking position for or against, has replaced the obligation to think. This leprosy of the mind began in political circles then spread throughout the country to almost all thinking. It is doubtful that we can cure this disease, which is killing us, if we do not start by abolishing political parties.

Criticism/Theory First Edition Paperback Texts in English   New       EUR 15 ORDER

Ariana Reines, The Origin of the World, Semiotext(e), 2014

“Immediately her word became accomplished fact.” 

Criticism/Theory First Edition Paperback Texts in English   New       EUR 15 out of stock

Chris Kraus, Lost Properties, Semiotext(e), 2014

Everyone wants to be an artist. The number of under- graduate students completing fine arts degrees at US colleges doubled in the years between 1985–2010, according to the Digest of Education Statistics. But being an artist doesn’t necessarily mean making drawings or paintings or sculpture or even installations or videos. The desire to pursue a life in “fine art” simply means a desire to respond creatively to the present, just as the disciplines of “poetry” or “rock & roll” were ciphers for countercultural lifestyles in other eras. 

Criticism/Theory First Edition Paperback 160 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 18 ORDER

Chris Kraus, Video Green: Los Angeles Art and the Triumph of Nothingness, Semiotext(e), 2004

Video Green examines the explosion of late 1990s Los Angeles art driven by high-profile graduate programs. Probing the surface of art-critical buzzwords, Chris Kraus brilliantly chronicles how the City of Angels has suddenly become the epicenter of the international art world and a microcosm of the larger culture. Why is Los Angeles so completely divorced from other realities of the city? Shrewd, analytic and witty, Video Green is to the Los Angeles art world what Roland Barthes’ Mythologies were to the society of the spectacle: the live autopsy of a ghost city.

Criticism/Theory, Fiction Second revised edition Paperback 248 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 18 ORDER

Chris Kraus, Aliens & Anorexia, Semiotext(e), 2000

As the rope was tightening around my neck, an Alien made love to me. Belief is a technology for softening the landscape. The world becomes more beautiful when God is in it. Here is what happens inside a person's body when they starve.
 
Written in the shadow of Georg Buchner's Lenz at razor pitch, Aliens & Anorexia, first published in 2000, defines a female form of chance that is both emotional and radical. The book unfolds like a set of Chinese boxes, using stories and polemics to travel through a maze that spirals back into itself. Its characters include Simone Weil, the first radical philosopher of sadness, the artist Paul Thek, Kraus herself, and "Africa," her virtual S&M partner who's shooting a big-budget Hollywood film in Namibia while Kraus holes up in the Northwest Woods for the winter to chronicle the failure of Gravity & Grace, her own low-budget independent film.
In Aliens & Anorexia, Kraus argues for empathy as the ultimate perceptive tool, and reclaims anorexia from the psychoanalytic girl-ghetto of poor "self-esteem." Anorexia, Kraus writes, could be an attempt to leave the body altogether: a rejection of the cynicism this culture hands us through its food.

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