Anthology, Poster First Edition Softcover Texts in English   Very good condition       EUR 35 out of stock

Coll., Images of an Era. The American Poster 1945-75, Smithsonian Institute, 1975

Catalog published on the occasion of the eponymous exhibition, shown in Washington, D.C.; Houston, Chicago, New York and several European cities throughout 1976 and 1977. Contains color reproductions of hundreds of posters produced by various American artists, designers and photographers between 1945 and 1975.

With texts by John Carrigan, Margaret Cogswell, Milton Glaser, Dore Ashton and Alan Gowans. Cover by Andy Warhol.

Criticism/Theory Softcover 192 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 18 ORDER

Douglas Crimp, Our Kind of Movie: The Films of Andy Warhol, MIT Press, 2012

“We didn’t think of our movies as underground or commercial or art or porn; they were a little of all of those, but ultimately they were just ‘our kind of movie.’”
—Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol was a remarkably prolific filmmaker, creating more than 100 movies and nearly 500 of the film portraits known as Screen Tests. And yet relatively little has been written about this body of work. Warhol withdrew his films from circulation in the early 1970s and it was only after his death in 1987 that they began to be restored and shown again. With Our Kind of Movie Douglas Crimp offers the first single-authored book about the full range of Andy Warhol’s films in forty years—and the first since the films were put back into circulation.

In six essays, Crimp examines individual films, including Blow Job, Screen Test No. 2, and Warhol’s cinematic masterpiece The Chelsea Girls (perhaps the most commercially successful avant-garde film of all time), as well as groups of films related thematically or otherwise—films of seductions in confined places, films with scenarios by Ridiculous Theater playwright Ronald Tavel. Crimp argues that Warhol’s films make visible new, queer forms of sociality. Crimp does not view these films as cinéma-vérité documents of Warhol’s milieu, or as camera-abetted voyeurism, but rather as exemplifying Warhol’s inventive cinema techniques, his collaborative working methods, and his superstars’ unique capabilities. Thus, if Warhol makes visible new social relations, Crimp writes, that visibility is inextricable from his making a new kind of cinema.

Exhibition catalogue First Edition Zine 24 pages Texts in English   New       EUR 16 ORDER

Conrad Ventur, Montezland, Boo Hooray, 2014

This publication was printed on the occasion of the exhibition MONTEZLAND, organized by ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Librairies and curated by Conrad Ventur and David Frantz. 

MONTEZLAND presents an expanded portrait of the legendary pre-Stonewall drag performer Mario Montez (1935-2013). Showcasing ephemera, photographs, documents, costumes, and film, the exhibition explores Montez’s role in and influence on the New York underground during the 1960s and 70s. MONTEZLAND includes recent collaborations between Montez and Ventur alongside documentation of Montez’s earlier works with Leandro Katz, Charles Ludlam, Hélio Oiticica, José Rodriguez-Soltero, Jack Smith, Andy Warhol, and Avery Willard, among others.

Criticism/Theory First Edition Paperback 250 pages Texts in English   Normal used condition
name of the former owner written on the first page,
o/w Fine
      EUR 15 out of stock

Parker Tyler, Underground Film: A Critical History, Grove Press, 1969

Parker Tyler was the first critic to write seriously about the early Underground film makers, especially about Stan Brakhage, Sidney Peterson, Gregory Markopoulos, Willard Maas and Maya Deren. Here he assesses their work along with that of Kenneth Anger, Ed Emshwiller, Ron Rice, Peter Kubelka, James Whitney, Stan VanDerBeek, Andy Warhol, Bruce Conner, Paul Sharits, Charles Boultenhouse, and other filmmakers. Discussing the specific films, he shows the variety of current aims and techniques, and traces their origins in Dada and Surrealism and in the classic of Buñuel, Cocteau, René Clair, Eisenstein, and Wiene. He assumes that critical values provide the true key for judging film achievement, and as a result, in this book Underground Film criticism attains a new dimension.

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